In Heart Note +

Most everything in nature has cycles.  Life is movement.  Things change.  It’s just how it goes.

As humans, we try desperately to identify and predict the cycles.  We depend on it.

Did you check the weather today?  You’re relying on cycle prediction.

When it’s pouring rain outside, thank heavens we have access to cycle prediction so we can stay dry under our umbrella.  It doesn’t make the rain go away, it just helps you prepare.

The same is true in our business.  Noticing the cycles doesn’t always give us the chance to influence the cycle to change, but it sure can help us prepare.

The Seasons

Seasons are one common business cycle. Surely, the sale of soccer gear begins to fall off in early winter, and similarly sales of skis begin to ramp up in early winter.

Sometimes, during the summer, you might experience a slowdown in client appointments.  People are extra busy, traveling and occupied with family things during summer time.  This is a cycle in our business.

Many people face Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) which dampens their mood during the winter months.  Knowing this cycle could be really supportive in managing your own expectations of yourself.  Perhaps as winter nears, you can bring more gentleness and mercy to your self and your work.

Have you clearly identified the seasonal cycles in your business?

How could doing so be helpful?

If you aware of a slower business season in the summer, then you can be proactive:

  1. Ramp up marketing to bring in new people during summer.
  2. Scale back during summer and take your own vacation, or take on a large project at home.
  3. Schedule some business development work during summer, when you have more space.
  4. Limit morning client appointments and spend them writing articles for your newsletter to last you through winter.

Knowing the cycle and seasons will help you make the most of this time.

Other Cycles

Another cycle that happens on a more micro level relates to emotion.

Ever been wiped out by an emotional event?

It’s true that we can’t always predict when taxing emotional events will strike. However, we can be conscious of how our emotions can impact us and adjust our work accordingly.

If your affected by a cycle of: anger –> distraction –> depletion –> sadness –> recovery –> baseline, then when you notice anger comes to visit, you can immediately adjust the following hours, days or weeks to honor the rest of the cycle.

Of course, this isn’t all linear and mathematical.  This is about taking notice and adjusting accordingly.

Identify Your Business Cycles

What I want to invite you to do is to identify your business cycles so you can be supported in anticipating bumps and shifts so they have less overall impact on you.

Here are a few steps which might help:

  1. Take note of what is happening when things feel like they aren’t going your way.  List out what those things are.  They could be tangible or intangible things.
  2. Notice how each of those things tends to impact you personally.  What happens? How do you react? What’s the impact? What effect is there?
  3. As you review these lists, notice if it’s something that feels familiar, or if it’s new?  If it feels familiar, then you might have identified a cycle.
  4. Be curious about what you can do to: A.) Care for yourself during times like this.  What do you need to do to take care of YOU? And, B.) Is there anything that you can do to anticipate the cycle earlier, or, when you first notice it, to take action to minimize the effect?  What might you like to try?

 

This generally isn’t something that is done in one sitting. Making yourself aware of cycles in your business and noticing them consistently over time is what will support you long term.

May all you notice contribute to your business growing and your heart staying nourished.

May the will of Love be done, all-ways. 💜

This article was written as an expansion of the thought in one of my Heart Notes.  Want notes of your own? Get yours right here.

 

 

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